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of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the sa; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice president: the clerk will call the names of the next group. the clerk: mr. cardin of maryland. mr. carper ofelaware. mr. casey of pennsylvania. mr. corker of tennessee. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice pre
in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
-- and told history of the united states. it draws on archival findings and recently declassified documents. it examined everything from the cold war to the fall of communism, continuing through to the obama administration. this is a trailer for the miniseries. >> i want to make it as exciting as it can be. history is an interesting subject. we want to report what actually happened. you cannot just except what is handed down. this is the key to the whole series, is to find out how we got to where we are. it is a great, great story. >> that was the trailer for "the untold history of the united states." it will air on monday evenings at 8:00 p.m. and is available on demand. oliver stone joins us here in new york, and we are joined by his co-author, peter. we welcome you both to "democracy now." oliver stone, you have been working on this for years, and be announced to people. why? >> it was apri big job for need. i have been working on it for four and a half years. i recently discussed wallace and the bomb at one of his glasses and we ended up talking for about an hour, hour-and-a-half. walla
america and the caribbean forced millions of people to leave their homes to migrate to the united states. we will play an excerpt of a conversation that i had with juan as well as the film's co- director. i want to encourage you to call in as we go to clips of the film in the interview because the faster you call in, the more of the interview we can play. the number to call, at the bottom of your screen drought the show, 866-359-4334. 866-359-4334. if you would like to get a copy of this remarkable film that is opening all over the country in march, call in right now and pledged $100. "harvested in higher" is yours. if you pledge $100, you can also get the book of juan gonzalez, which the film is booked on. at holiday time, just a few weeks ago, the curators of the smithsonian recommended reading his book, which is required reading in classrooms across the country. it is an amazing book, "harvest of the entire." if you want to get both, what an incredible educational resource. the book and dvd are yours for contribution of $150. think about that as he watched recall in. let us know you a
by coming to the united states. >> eduardo lopez, you have remarkable footage that has never been seen before in this country throughout. in a moment, we're going to el salvador to talk about what drove a lot of the migration here. where did you get it? >> many, many sources. there's a lot of footage that has never been seen, that hasn't been seen in decades. again, this is a testament to the team that created this. our editor, catherine shields, is amazing. and so is our co-director, peter getzels. i have to say about the dominican republic, i'd like to make a point that one of the main reasons we made this film is to be personified by junot diaz, who is contributing as one of our great american writers. his whole life was changed dramatically by our invasion of the dominican republic in 1965 with 23,000 marines. something that most americans know nothing about because all of this history is never taught in our schools and colleges. so for latinos, whose life is turned upside down by our own government actions and latin america that many times we are unaware of, what happens is there
the government will treat them as badly as the united states treats them or worse. there are still a few prisoners in guantanamo, the weakest from china, the chinese government. there are some in guantanamo cleared for release. and still held. i don't actually understand why they are still held. they were under the dictator ben all the who has been disposed. one issue needs to be looked at this why specific people are held, and one that many of us have been campaigning on for many years is the last british resident in guantanamo and the united states government has clearly said they want to release him. he is on a list of 65 who need to be released in september but the first time the united states government said the names and identities of 65 of these agencies. we have it printed, the united states government -- we have from the british government the statements over the years they want to be reunited for four british children and those of us who have been studying this thing is is because he knows too much. use a very eloquent man and fight for the rights of prisoners and knows the sto
u.s. banks offline one day, one bank after another. if the united states and israel bomb iran next year to stop the nuclear program i think we can say with high confidence that iran will retaliate. since israel or united states have attacked their homeland iran will attack in our homeland. not with terrorism but with cyber war, knocking out banking prehaps, electricity, causing havoc and getting away with it because we cannot defend successfully today against that kind of attack. [applause] >> that's a sobering thought to start a conversation with. as it happened, there were two pages in this week's "economists" that you should have on this subject on cyber war and i think it is helpful, if you can walk us through what exactly is meant by cyber war. you, yourself, mention cyber crime, cyber espionage there is a blurring of the lines. what do you mean by cyber war? >> you can rebbe using the word chuw. criber crime which is successful -- cyber crime which is successful. the cyber espionage which i think is the most serious thing today, that is the theft not 06 money but information,
and gentlemen, the journey we began together in 2001, that is afghanistan and the united states. it was for a great cause. freeing civilians from terrorism and radicalism, little bitter rating afghanistan -- liberating afghanistan from an invasion and a rule by the taliban. the first one, in reverse order, the first one freeing afghanistan happened within a month and a half to two months. subbing squect of that afghanistan began its journey towards democracy, the rule of law, progress in all aspects of life. it went all right. it went reasonablely good under the circumstances. without a doubt with the help of the united states and our other allies around the world. the second part, freeing us all from terrorism and radicalism, didn't work as swiftly as we expected. there was bumps along the road and setbacks. now, the afghan people regardless where they stand recognize that afghanistan could not have made the progress that we have made in the past 10 years without the help we received from our allies. led by the united states of america. in more cruder terms the u.s. taxpayer's
in the united states with their families while they work to earn green cards. as long as their relatives are u.s. citizens. the middle east tv news giant making a big move here in here e united states, al-jazeera bought current tv from former vice president al gore. all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." first from fox at 3:00, in with the new and out with the old. that is capitol hill hours ago, the historically unpopular 112th congress met a final time making way for the 113th congress. here is vice president biden swearing in members of the united states senate including 13 newcomers. on the other side, the house of representatives floor where new and returning members are sworn in. all eyes squarely on the embattled house speaker john boehner, the republican leader, underfire from members of his party over the troubled fiscal cliff negotiations and, too, his handling of the relief for victims of sandy. the question: would the backlash cost him the leadership job? mike, live on capitol hill. the speaker kept his job but there were defections and a lot of grum
, but i was interested in, i think, the real question is what kind of a iraq did the united states leave behind after sacrifice of 145 american lives lost, temperatures of thousands wounded, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent. what was the american policy towards iraq, and what's iraq look like today? that was the question i sought to address, but i covered the entire scope of the war. >> a year op, or, i guess, in december 2011, what had we achieved, and a year on, have we achieved that? >> well, by the time of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i thi
kind of iraq did the united states leave behind after all the sacrifice, the american lives lost, the tens of thousands wounded, the billions of dollars expended. what was american policy toward iraq and what does iraq look like today said it is the question that i sought to address by in the up pretty much covered in the entire scope of the war since a lot of reporting on it. >> host: so a year on our december 2011 what have we achieved in a year on had we still achieved then? >> guest: well, why the time, by december of 2011, they're had been a number of elections in iraq, which is to the good, but iraq hadn't fully become a democracy in the sense that it hadn't been a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led by maliki to another pamela starr. i think that is a true test of democracy is whether there isn't an election and russia has elections as i served there there's another candidate wins and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq hasn't set that milestone yet. so, what we had in december of 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but i think un
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the vice president: the chair lays before the senate one certificate of appointment to fill an unexpired term and the certificates of election of 33 senators elected for six-year terms beginning on january 3, 2013. all certificates, the chair is advised, are in the form suggested by the senate or contain all the essential requirements of the form suggested by the senate. if there be no objection, the reading of the certificates will be waived and they will be printed in full in the record. if the senators to be sworn will now present themselves at the desk of four as their names are called in alphabetical order, the chair will administer the oath of office. the clerk will read the names of the first group. the clerk: miss baldwin of wisconsin. mr. barrasso of wyoming. mr. brown of ohio. ms. cantwell of washington. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will suppor
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
for the dispatch center and notified for our doc. our unit down there. and what happens is our doc will then notify, you are going to hear it on the radio and so we already have these vrt units in the third boxes, the responses and so the violent reduction team unit and the crime investigation units and our gang task force and homicide unit all respond depending on what the severity is. obviously if they died, the homicide will go out there. once the people get there and once the initial officers and the violence reduction teams get there, there is going to be an assessment made. they are going to try to acquire education or knowledge about what happened there and whether it was gang related. currently if that happens, and we have gone through this past weekend as soon as there is an assessment made of the situation, whereby we believed that it was gang related. we will do the redeployment and each week we sent out a schedule and it goes out to the violence reduction team and our swat team and our honda unit and it puts our trouble hot spots on the map and it is not only for gang involved shootings
or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? i do.ndistinct conversations >> congratulations, senator. [indistinct conversations] [laughter] >> okay. [indistinct conversations] >> will you pull that back a little bit? >> you have to pull back so we can see the most important part of this team. please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? >> i
panel would be familiar to what we have heard today. if there were talking about the united states. they would say there is a general consensus that reform is necessary on major issues. there is no general consensus. there is grave doubt as to where the system will be able to overcome to produce in the united states important reforms that will leave this country in a reformed state as opposed to hard battles that will results reforms that are ineffective. that question is paramount. it is paramount in the united states as we look at some of the same issues. having said that, despite the vast differences between mexico and the united states, we really are quite similar. there is the feeling that something new is needed. the does not seem to be a consensus on how to get there. in general terms, i think how each of the government's in l with -- governments dea the reforms will require a great deal of care. i will explain that. i think most of the people in this room understand the relationship between mexico and the united states is generally a healthy relationship. this is not always
yesterday and the subject wag illegal in-law units which are present throughout the city and one of the group in the specific area in the city indicated it was his feeling up to 80% of the units there had illegal -- or housing individual housing units there had an illegal unit in it. and i think this is an issue that we have to confront eventually because it's got a lot of -- it's a lot of effects on the entire housing stock. and one of them that came to mind for me is the fact that when there are two units in building it raises the price of building significantly and you really have prices based upon two units, not on one. and it might explain why, when i and starting to practice places in modest homes in the sunset and richmond victor were around 40,000. the increases each in the most pricey areas are 10 times what they were in those days, 10 to maybe 12 times. in places like the sunset and parts of the richmond, they're 20 times. these houses are selling for 800,000. so i'm not saying the total cause of this is secondar secony units, but it does detract from the affordability
states, he will protect the constitution of the united states, and that is what i hope he takes very literally, and not hypocritically. i hope that he does take it literally, like i said. >> he brings up the topic of guns and gun violence. something that we will hear from the president in the weeks ahead. do you think it will be in the inaugural address? >> not explicitly. maybe some reference to making our country safer, keeping our children safe may be in their, but he will not make a pitch for gun legislation, not explicitly. >> what makes a successful second inaugural address? [laughter] >> getting to make it. [laughter] being there. it has to have a good sense of the moment. it has to be not too time bound, and it needs a sense of history as well, because only then will be read years and generations down the road. >> i agree, it has to assure the country we are on the right path, we can build on what we have done the first four years, in need to be optimistic, not fatalistic, and again, it has to have the broad themes that will be fleshed out in later policy speeches. >> te
>> i ask president obama to do the right thing. the united states must renounce its which hunt against wikileaks. the united states must dissolve its fbi investigation. >> as julian assange remains holed up in the ecuadorean embassy in london, we look at a new documentary called "we steal secrets: the story of wikileaks ." today, academy award winning filmmaker alex gibney, and jennifer robinson, legal counsel to assange. >> the laws cannot protect us. >> the new documentary examines how millions have died from aids because big pharmaceutical companies and the united states refused to allow developing nations to import life-saving generic drugs. we speak with the film's director and and a doctor, peter mugyenyi, who was arrested trying to import generic drugs into the gondola. -- uganda. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the obama administration has again delayed its decision on the keystone xl will pipeline, now saying it will not come before march. president obama initially sidestepped the issue in 2011 by putting it off unti
the way back to a deal that john lewis and harry truman made in 1946. the united mine workers and i insisted on a new law that we called the coal act protecting 200,000 miners and their families today. we actually helped avert a nationwide coal strike in 1994. in that fight, and so many others, we have been proud to stand with the working men and women of america. steelworkers, teachers, nurses, and everyone deserves a fair wage and a safe place to work with a basic health care. [applause] our country cannot be as great as it should be unless our workers voices are heard and respected. not only by everybody in general, but certainly policymakers. i am just a single-minded about comprehensive health-care reform. i know is not particularly popular in west virginia, but it's ok. because of my fingerprints are all over it, i know is good and i know it will benefit west virginia more than any other state. it is so incredibly complex, not just the 17% of gdp has people like to say, but it is so complex and involved and interests of people, nuances that we just had to do something about it
. if you listen to african american women talk about churches in the united states, you'll hear concerns. you will hear concerns from sisters in islam, a really wonderful group in malaysia talking how to reinterpret the koran so women's integrity is more full-fledged. so it's not really an answer to your question, but it does mean we have a much bigger agenda that if we take religion seriously is to watch a women engage with religion, both state and has organized process and what kind of gender analysis, what the gender analysis show you about the part is of a particular religion in particular places. i know from a serbian feminist friends that there is an enormous alarm now in the reassertion of the serbian orthodox christian church in serbian political life. there is also a lot of of armed amongst russian feminists about the closeness of the putin government to the russian orthodox church now. so you have to watch over time. you have to listen seriously to feminists in any country before you make a function. you have to be curious about how women live their religious lives or nonreligi
in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we v a series of feisty debates on the hot topics of the day. we start with president obama's nomination of senator chuck hagel to be the next secretary of defense. we have a clash you will want to watch. >>> then the relationship between the united states and russia keeps getting worse, whose fault is it? moscow or washington? a debate. also, the next fight in washington will be over the debt ceiling. can president obama end this craziness and bypass congress altogether? we'll talk about the out of the box solutions and whether they would work. >>> and, finally, this is the signature of the man who might be the next treasury secretary. we'll look back through history to see if there's any loopy president. speaking of secretaries of the treasury three former holders of the office and many other statesmen and women offering advice to the president on a new gps special tonight "memo to the president, road map for a second term." tonight at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. >>> first, here's my take. chuck hagel's nomination
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
ranked as one of the most literate cities in the united states. multiple reading events are happening every night of the year competing against a big names like city arts and lectures. radar was voted the winner of these san francisco contest. after two decades of working for free michelle is able to make radar her full-time job. >> i am a right to myself, but i feel like my work in this world is eagerly to bring writers together and to produce literary events. if i was only doing my own work, i would not be happy. it is, like throwing a party or a dinner party. i can match that person with that person. it is really fun for me. it is nerve wracking during the actual readings. i hope everyone is good. i hope the audience likes them. i hope everybody shows up. but everything works out. at the end of the reading, everyone is happy. ♪ shortly. >> if you would like to speak on an agendized item please fill out a speaker card and when speaking before the commission, do state your name for the record. at this time, i'd like to take roll. commission president fong, here
in for his second term as the 44th president of the united states. good morning. i'm gwen eiffel and welcome to his pbs news hour special coverage of today's nailingration. >> i'm jeffrey brown. it's a bright sunny day here in washington. temperatures remain in the 30's. that's a bit warmer than four years ago for the president's first inauguration. that of course saw a record-setting crowd, nearly 2 million people. no one is expecting anything quite like that this time around but still, folks have been finding spaces on the mall tonight since the sun came up. you can see them setting up spots now. we will be covering the entire inaugural ceremony live. and if you're not at your tv you can watch our live stream on our home page at news hour.pbs.org or follow us on twitter. >> this earmarks the 150th anniversary of the man'spation proclamation. you can see bill and hillary clinton on the podium. there are also people there celebrating the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first preside
in the united states and see what their efforts are. i want to begin with jeanne robinson, chief financial officer of first book. if you could describe what it is to start. >> yes, i just want to say thank you to c-span for all the support you've given tdi or industry and reading, literacy. c-span has been a leader on that and it's wonderful just to salute you. first book is a nonprofit and provides books and educational material to programs, serving cantonese, classroom serving kids in need across the united states. >> how to shoot it started and where the future funding from? >> we started 20 years ago. in fact, were celebrating her 100 millionth book distributed this week, probably when this airs, it will have been last week. we started 20 years ago at martha's table in washington d.c. we have distributed more and more as the years have gone by because we started a new remodel. in recent years redistributed 10 million, 11 million a year. we support programs across the united states is now over 40,000. our funding comes from corporate cause marketing campaigns we do as well as individual
where he had been holed up for nearly six months. we spoke about the united states targeting of wikileaks, of his new book. i interviewed julian assange. we began by asking him about the european commission decision that the credit card company be said did not break the european union's antitrust rule by blocking donations to wikileaks. >> the decision is disgraceful, but it is only a preliminary decision. hopefully, they will turn around before the end of the year. the commission had been investigating our plans for 16 months. the normal turnaround time is 14 months. the european parliament last week voted through an article 32, a section on how banks should be reformed, credit card companies performed, in order to start a conditional financial blockade, such as the one being applied. all 47 ministers last year passed a resolution saying these sorts of arbitrary financial blockade on wikileaks should not continue. it is interesting to see what is happening in the political world in europe, on the one hand, the parliament, and on the other hand, the commission. it has been kn
active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several times ago actually issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights in civil commitments, and really look at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so it's kind of an ongoing project, and is in a host of different context, another talk by specific context, but this people, people civilly committed for mental because of mental illness. and there are a range of issues that the aclu has been working on with partner groups to actually address and raise the due process concerns about civil commitment. >> can you explain something about the philosophy behind incarceration, and why, what is the idea behind isolating a person so acutely? >> so, aside from the campaign to end overincarceration, the aclu likes of the campaigns, but another one is a campaign to stop the use of solitary or at least significantly curb its use. we've been very active the last se
you around the world in 60 minutes. we begin with nuclear threats against the united states. north korea announced plans to test more nuclekes and more lon range rocket launches. north korea's defense commission calls america the sworn enemy of the korean people. i want to get straight to new york. >> the words are very threatening. it is very incredible to hear them directly threaten united states in that way just ahead of what they say will be another nuclear test. what i'm hearing and what analysts are saying is that is probably how one would have expected them to react. it comes just a day after yet more u.s. action and u.n. action at the security council and more sanction action. most people believe this is not a threat of attacking the united states but certainly the words are threatening to the united states. they say analysts that this is north korea's way of trying to deter any further action from the international community. and that they have no capacity to invade in terms of long range missiles to reach the u.s. it is a serious issue if they do test any kind of nuclear
. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states. [applause] >> for myself and for our nation, i want to thank my predecessor for all he has done to heal our land. [applause] in this outward and physical ceremony, we attest once again to the inner and spiritual strength of our nation. as my high school teacher, miss julia coleman, used to say, "we must adjust to changing times and still hold to unchanging principles." here before me is the bible used in the inauguration of our first president, in 1789, and i have just taken the oath of office on the bible my mother gave me just a few years ago, opened to a timeless admonition from the ancient prophet micah -- "he hath showed thee, o man, what is good, and what doth the lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy god." this inauguration ceremony marks a new beginning, a new dedication within our government, and a new spirit among us all. a president may sense and proclaim that new
ever bless the united states of america. [applause] >> the united states marine band. my country tis of thee sweet land of liberty if thee i sing land where my fathers died lad of the pilgrim's pride from every mountain side let freedom ring ♪ let music sweel the beach and ring from all the trees sweet freedom songs let silence break the sound prolonged ♪ our father guide to thee father of liberty to thee we sing ♪ long may our land be bright with freedom's holy light protect us by the might great god, our king ♪ >> pwow. our next distinguished guest is the appellate issue will share with us where -- poet who will share with us words he has composed for this location. occasion. >> one today. one sun rose on us today kindles over our shores greeting the facves of the great lakes acrossng a simple truth the greatplains rooftops, aking upf under each one a story told by oiur silten gestures my face, your face millions of faces each one yawning to life crescendoing to our day the pencil yellow school buses, for it stands, oranges betting our praise. sobered trucks and heavy with
for congress extending the borrowing authority of the united states. >> will they roll it out. >> you can speculate about a lot of things, but there's not-- nothing needs to come to these kinds of, you know, speculative notion about how to deal with a problem easily resolved by congress doing its job. very simply, since treasury, i believe, overseas printing and minting, you might ask treasury. >> at no point in-- >> and joining me now the chairman of the south carolina democratic party and mark theeson, enterprise institute and former speech writer for george w. bush. if congress doesn't give him the authority to raise the debt limit, he has the end around it with the trillion dollar coin he could just sort of say is there and allows him to spend more because we have this extra savings to really boil it down. mark, your thoughts? >> this, this may be one of the stupidest ideas ever to come out of washington and that's saying something. it's not clear it's legal. edward moy, under bush and obama may say it's legal to print a trillion dollars platinum coin, it doesn't have a trillion dolla
by an unmanned u.s. plane. he was one of the top commanders. it was part of the tribal region where the united states has been targeting insurgent leaders. he has been killed with five others. we are joined from islamabad for more on who the man was. >> he was a senior commander from the south region who was active in carrying out attacks inside afghanistan. he made no secret of it. he was a respected member of the tribe. the tribe lives on both sides of the border. he offered a great help to the pakistani authorities when he took on the fallen fighters. he moved them from their territory and it enabled the pakistani military to go on a major offensive against another try. an important figure -- against another try and. tribe.her >> the strikes appear to be undermining efforts to come to a truce in the region. >> it was not just been thrown strike that killed him, but another strike that had not far away. there were two drones strikes. 10 people killed and four other people killed. a rescue is underway to see if there are any survivors. there have been questions about the thrones strikes. paki
of the united states and made friends with its enemies. critics say he is dangerously dogmatic. what will happen if he's incapacitated? >> if he's out of the picture, there will be dramatic changes in venezuela. it is a coutnry used to having chavez at the center of the political anatomy. >> claiming to champion the poor and depressed every year, can his political creed survive? that as well as praise for uncertainty and change. -- is braced for uncertainty and change. >> i spoke a brief time ago with the president of the inter- american dialogue. if he is too sick to be sworn in for his new term as president, what happens? dodge the opposition is beginning the top line. they are different interpretations and a very polarized situation. >> what are the main challenges facing venezuela? >> high inflation, a huge fiscal deficit, a major oil producer. the insecurity and violence and crime has risen dramatically. whatever government succeeds, he will have his hands full. >> he was defiantly anti- american. any chance that there is to be a change in leadership? >> the chance for communication in wash
's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function cont
, wicked, jekyll & hyde all getting together at the end of this month raise money for the united way. >> bill: good for them. good for them. thank you dan. yes, indeed, an historic day at the white house. i got out of my sickbed to go down for the announcement in the east room. president obama coming out at 1:10 and announcing the final two members of the national security team. last week he nominated john kerry, a great choice to be secretary of state. yesterday, he presented to the world his next two picks. >> obama: to help meet the challenges of our time, i'm proud to announce my choice for two key members of my national security team. chuck hagel for secretary of defense and john brennan for directorror of the central intelligence agency. >> bill: the president was adamant in his praise of hagel who the president befriended when he was a member of the senate traveled with him to iraq and afghanistan, got to know him as independent centrist moderate, republican. and was willing to stand up to the leaders of his own party and say they were wrong. originally voted for the war in ir
now the code-liaison to the alcohol licensing unit. my partner is here. charlie, would you introduce yourself? he is my partner. what we do is run the daily operations of the unit. we are also the sounding board for them when it comes to the various type of permits and licenses we may be having difficulties with. i have my units working with the permit officers at those stations, who are the first line, reporting directly to their captains. i wanted to say that my highest priority is public safety. when we review an application for a new venue, be it entertainment, a bar, or a night club, it is very important that we look at the impact the venue will have on the neighborhood, and the community itself. however, i must also keep in mind and be aware of entrepreneurship and small business owners as the backbone of our city. they had a lot to the culture and flavor of san francisco and we do not want to lose that. we take these factors into consideration. ultimately be want everyone to have an enjoyable and safe time when they go out after hours to enjoy the city at night. that is my vie
science positions every year in the united states cannot be filled by available american workforce positions. and i have positions that need to be filled so that our technology industry can continue to thrive. simply put, u.s. based companies have a great need for those trained in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. but at least right now there are not enough americans trained and ready to fill these jobs. we cannot continue to simply hope that american companies do not move operations to countries where they have greater access for individuals trained in these s.t.e.m. fields. we cannot continue to ignore this problem. it's that simple. continued in action -- especially since the american enterprise institute has confirmed 100 foreign-born workers with s.t.e.m. degrees create an average of 262 additional jobs for nativeborn workers. let me tell you, these countries would love to have the american educated ph.d's and other highly educated individuals return and boost their economies. not only from their acquired skills, but also by creating these new jobs as well.
and the government is getting violent. the united states is getting involved. they're threatening to take control of the entire country. the militants' move prompted france to take action over the weekend. they put boots on the ground and went all in, bombing rebel training camps and other targets. so what will the united states do? a pentagon official told me this afternoon that the u.s. will participate in mali, but, and i want to make sure i put quotes around this, it's still deciding what that looks like. when we went to the mali border last summer, i saw first hand how dangerous the situation is. today, we spoke to some of our sources on the ground, including the military commander of the al qaeda's linked group. he told us that the militants are, in his words, excited and would welcome u.s. troops on the ground. he also said the french bombs have killed civilians and that france is signing a death warrant for french people around the world, opening the gates of hell. omar said the militants will fight to the end and this will be a long war, more dangerous than afghanistan or iraq. we also s
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